This fashionable composer and singer was a frequent guest at Jack Fuller's London homes. Fuller first had a townhouse on Wimpole Street in 1781 then moved to 36 Devonshire Place in 1798. 

John Braham is considered by many to be the greatest English tenor of all time. Born to a Jewish family, originally named Abraham or Abram, he was noted for his splendid voice and keen business sense. Although he made his debut at the Royalty Theatre in London's East End in 1787, he first experienced great success in Drury Lane in 1796.

Braham was best known for his stirring "sea songs".  His rendition of  'The Death of Nelson" written by Samuel James Arnold was his most popular song and his stock encore. Other typical Georgian songs in his repertoire include 'The Anchor's Weigh'd' , also penned by Arnold, and 'Twas in Trafalgar's Bay'.  He travelled all over Europe and won great acclaim from people in high places, notably Napoleon. It is safe to assume he left 'The Death of Nelson' off the program for that performance.
Having acquired a considerable fortune by the 1830s, John Braham decided to invest it, for his retirement, in building a new theatre. He bought a property, that had most recently been a hotel,in King Street, St. James's, London for £8,000. A further £18,000 was  invested in renovations.  The new 'St James's Theatre' opened on 14 December 1835, although the exterior of the building was not finished until the summer of the following year. Unfortunately the theatre was demolished in 1957 to make way for an office block.

Braham embarked on a tour of Europe in 1797, with noted Italian/English soprano Anna Selina "Nancy" Storace ,which took them to Florence, Milan, Naples and Venice. Storace, 11 years Braham's senior, was pregnant when they returned to London in 1801. Their son William Spencer Harris Braham was born on May 3, 1802.

John Braham
Watercolour by
Richard Dighton
c. 1815-1820
John Braham
Miniature on Ivory
artist unknown
c. 1834
St James's Theatre
Recitative:
                  O'er Nelson's Tomb,
                  With silent grief oppress'd,
                  Britannia mourns her Hero,
                  Now at rest:
                  But those bright laurels
                  Ne'er shall fade with years,
                  Whose leaves are water'd
                  By a Nation's tears.
Aria:
                  'Twas in Trafalgar's bay
                  We saw the Frenchman lay,
                  Each heart was bounding then.
                  We scorned the foreign yoke,
                  For our Ships were British Oak,
                  And hearts of oak our men!
                  Our Nelson mark'd them on the wave,
                  Three cheers our gallant Seamen gave,
                  Nor thought of home or beauty.
                  Along the line this signal ran,
                  England expects that ev'ry man
                  This day will do his duty!

Excerpt from:  The Death of Nelson
Vice Admiral
Horatio Lord Nelson KB
his connection to the Fuller genealogy

www.admiralnelson.org
HOME | FULLER | FOLLIES | FAMILY| FRIENDS | FAITH  | FEATURES
Wyon
Turner
Thrale
Smirke
Sloane
Shield
Repton
Faraday
Cipriani
Chantrey
Burney
Brown
Braham
Belloc
Arne
John 'Mad Jack' Fuller
John Braham - Opera Singer 1774 -1856
RECENT  RESEARCH
Blog & Search
FULLER FAMILY
Genealogy Pages
JOIN FACEBOOK GROUP